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1980’s

This tag is associated with 27 posts

Corey Haim – Lost Boy

It was the summer of 1987, and I was truanting school with a friend and two girls, one of whom I was smitten with. We made our way to the local cinema and saw The Lost Boys. By the time it was over, I had forgotten the girl and was totally enamoured with the film. I probably didn’t shut up about it all the way home. It was the first of many viewings, and the catalyst for many nights of teenage fantasy, discussing how cool it would be to be a vampire, or one of the Frog Brothers, or Corey Haim….

Hannah & Her Sisters (1986)

Annie Hall is nearly always cited as fidgety New Yorker Woody Allen’s best work. And while I’ll agree that it is a great movie, his best film will, for me, always be Hannah & Her Sisters. There are many reasons for this, and perhaps not the most insignificant being the amount of screen time that Allen has in this film (let’s face it, the guy can get annoying)…

Rowland S. Howard, R.I.P.

As guitarist/songwriter with Melbourne’s Boys Next Door, who then morphed into The Birthday Party (then on to collaborations with Lydia Lunch, to Crime and the City Solution, and These Immortal Souls, and then on to solo efforts), he was the man beside Nick Cave who served up the frightening sounds that scraped the back curtains with feedback and laid the sonic landscape…

The King Of Comedy (1983)

In 1983, Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese had already collaborated on four films together, culminating in De Niro’s Oscar for Raging Bull in 1980. This dynamite team had been at the forefront of the groundbreaking decade of cinema known as the 1970s, and when they made The King Of Comedy in ‘83, the pair had reached a level of singular sophistication in their method and delivery…

Mad Max 2 (1981)

In a post-apocalyptic world, the only commodity of value is “guzzoline” (yep, food is secondary) and for Max, it’s a never-ending quest to secure the stuff. When he agrees to help a ragtag band of survivors drive a tanker full of the precious liquid away from their compound, it is merely an excuse to stage some kick-ass chase scenes in the Australian outback…

Crystal Castles – Crystal Castles (2008)

By placing digital breadcrumbs of sound throughout the album, they manage to draw you in, as if sleepwalking into a black hole. And as you pass through the event horizon everything is bleached white, and you adjust your eyes, making out a new soft country made of beats ripped straight from the ancient sound-banks of the Commodore 64 and the Amiga 500…

The Fly (1986) • Robocop (1987) • The Shining (1980)

Teleportation. It’s what scientist Seth Brundle (Goldblum) believes will change the course of mankind. And he’s probably right. But before he can unleash the technology onto the world – being unsatisfied with teleporting inanimate objects – he decides to zap himself through his teleportation “pods” in his funky downtown warehouse and inadvertently traps a common house fly inside during the process…

Lush – Spooky (1992) • Scarlett Johansson – Anywhere I Lay My Head (2008) • Sigue Sigue Sputnik – Flaunt It (1986)

Remember Lush? Like many bands of the early 90s, Lush became kind of big and also a bit dwarfed by the explosion of the alternate music scene, which gave rise to countless new bands vying for a piece of the booming major-label pre-internet spotlight. Some bands got a bit overlooked in the process. Anyway. Lush produced some damn good music and a couple of really cool albums. This was their first (studio album)…

Mazzy Star – So Tonight That I Might See (1993) • William Orbit – Hello Waveforms (2006) • Grace Jones – Nightclubbing (1981)

Mazzy Star are one of those bands that have a shadowy little corner of music history all to themselves. I imagine they’re still recruiting fans with their slow, sexy, scuzzed-up sound. They were never a popular band as such, but they were a serious cult band. And those bands just keep growing in status long after their official life is over. They were a little bit Velvet Underground, a little bit country, a little bit bluesy, a little bit folkie, a little bit gothic, a little bit psychedelic…

Salvador (1986) • Midnight Run (1988) • Koyaanisqatsi (1983)

It is also a deeply affecting personal drama, anchored by an astounding performance from Woods and afforded equally impressive support from Belushi. Based on the true story of co-writer Boyle’s experiences in Central America, this intelligent and gripping film is as pertinent today as it was in its year of release. One of Stone’s best films that sits proudly alongside the director’s masterpiece JFK

Langley Parks: Soundscapes, Themes & Noise – free individual track download…

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